7.3.09

on writing: framing out the wiggle stuff

by Samuel Saint Thomas

I can't believe I'm still learning how to see. I figure if I learn to do that, I can write. I'm not talking about eyesight. More correctly, I'm talking about learning to look. I see too much. I want to look, as Martin Heidegger suggests, so as to allow for a clearing, as if to licht or light up a thing or thought. That way i'll get a chance to examine it apart from the rest of things. Allowing for a clearing saves me from the hoard of clutter in my head, the diverse stream of stuff of the world I live in. In a clearing, ideas and things get a chance to be understood and experienced.

When poking at things and ideas in a clearing is working, I feel I am writing. Just as I frame a photograph or compose a painting, placing my subject on its own is a way of framing out the clutter that might keep me from seeing a certain few colors, objects, or textures. That's my idea of story anyway, allowing people, places, memories, details as needed, to stand in a clearing. Perhaps, in doing so, I may get closer to stuff, understand stuff more clearly, and if I'm lucky, my readers will too. It's hard work though, trying to understand things in, as Alan Watts says, this wiggly world.

I think this too. What with Raymond Carver, James Joyce, John Updike, Amy Tan, William Faulkner and all the other brilliant minds in people's laps, why should I want to go through all the work? I remember reading somewhere of Bob Dylan moaning about songwriting, "There's enough good ones already." One could say that about poetry, prose, and all the rest of the hybrids annexed and prefixed with the words free, acid, flash, beat, jazz.

But for some reason, that I haven't figured out just yet, and despite the deep doubt that there's a hole on someones' shelf for a book written by Samuel Saint Thomas, still, I do it. I write. I like it. It juices me. And tapping away in the middle of the night makes me think I'm getting a wiggly thing or two of my life to sit still for a spell. Then something else gets wiggly. Then there's more tapping.

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1 comment:

  1. i liked what you said about seeing, do you know the saying that goes 'not knowing how to listen neither can they speak', don't you think it's similar? But it's good to be lost in the forest too. Glades and nymphs and all, especially if you 'expect the unexpected'--who's anyone to say anything unless they're dead, right, but we need live voices even if they're rambling.

    ps I'm sending this one invitation out to you to be the first (I think) to visit my page asanother.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete

hey thanks for the exchange.. great minds engage in healthy banter..